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Winter Stations returns!

Delayed by COVID-19, four winning public art installations spring to life in Toronto’s Distillery District.

The Epitonium  2

The Epitonium by M. Yengiabad - Shahed M. Yengiabad, Elaheh M. Yengiabad, Alemeh M. Yengiabad and Mojtaba Anoosha, Iran. On display in The Distillery District. Photo credit: Khristel Stecher.

Great design can’t be stopped! Due to the pandemic, the 2021 edition of Toronto’s popular Winter Stations design competition was paused. But with the return of summer and outdoor gatherings, Toronto’s Distillery District welcomes the public to Spring Stations, a belated debut of this year's winning installations. Founded in 2015 by RAW Design, Ferris + Associates and Curio, the international design competition receives entries from around the world. The theme this year is Refuge, and in the four installations now on view, that concept comes beautifully, thoughtfully, to life. Here’s a sneak peek of what you can see in the Distillery District and at 33 Parliament Street, now through July. 

The Epitonium

The Epitonium

The Epitonium by M. Yengiabad - Shahed M. Yengiabad, Elaheh M. Yengiabad, Alemeh M. Yengiabad and Mojtaba Anoosha, Iran. On display in The Distillery District. Photo credit: Khristel Stecher.

This sculpture was inspired by Epitoniidae, a class of predatory sea snails that sport a protective cone shell, featuring spiral ridges. It was made to be a representation of a natural shelter that’s both beautiful and functional at the same time.

From Small Beginnings 

From Small Beginnings

From Small Beginnings by Jack Leather and Charlie Leather, UK. On display in The Distillery District. Photo credit: Khristel Stecher.

As a result of the lockdown, more people have found themselves connecting with the outdoors. This installation signifies this shift as a patch of wilderness in an urban space. As visitors get closer to the sculpture, they can take refuge and notice the bright interior – symbolic of the opportunities that can arise during challenging times. Visitors are encouraged to take a sapling with them (placed within the sculpture) to replant at their homes – continuing its journey with their own.

ARc de Blob 

ARc de Blob

ARc de Blob by Aleksandra Belitskaja, Ben James and Shaun McCallum, Austria/UK. On display in The Distillery District. Photo credit: Khristel Stecher.

Bursting with colour, this refuge and architectural landmark attractss visitors with its vibrancy and striking composition. For viewers using the free mobile app, the arch becomes a virtual portal and the design is brought to life through Augmented/Mixed Reality. A door to mesmerizing virtual worlds, it was designed to encourage people to interact with the installation both digitally and physically. To see what it’s like, visit www.iheartblob.com/arc-de-blob

THROBBER 

THROBBER

THROBBER by Heidundgriess - Alexandra Grieß and Jorel Heid, Germany. On display at 33 Parliament Street. Photo credit: Khristel Stecher.

A group of 10 small trapezoidal rooms pieced together, this installation is meant to be explored. Together as one, the rooms form the colour spectrum of a rainbow. From an aerial view, the installation is in the shape of a “throbber”, the buffering icon used by computer programs when loading information. Adopted from the digital world, it functions as a symbol that speaks to the running of time.

Later this summer, Winter Stations and The Beach Village BIA will be presenting Summer Stations with ARc de Blob; Stay tuned via https://winterstations.com/ for opening dates.

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